ACSER Guest Lecture: Space Activities at the German Center of Applied Space Technologies and Microgravity (ZARM)

ZARM Drop Tower
ZARM Drop Tower
23 February 2017 - 1:00pm
Lecture Theatre M18, Northern Mezzanine Level (on external stairs), Chemical Sciences Building (Building F10), UNSW Kensington

This talk will give a short introduction to ZARM with its 140m droptower used for microgravity experiments. We will present recent works in the area of satellite propagation and micro satellites. In particular we will discuss the role of the modelling of non-gravitational forces influencing orbit propagation for a number of missions ranging from NASAs Pioneer missions to ESA/EU Missions like Rosetta and Galileo. Furthermore we will present our concept for a cubesat payload aiming at the in-situ analysis of the degradation optical surface properties which have a large influenceon spacecraft thermal budgets. The first more general part of the talk will be given by Dr.-Ing. Benny Rievers, followed by a short dedicated presentation on a test of the gravitational redshift using the EU Galileo spacecrafts by Msc. Felix Finke.

 

Benny Rievers is a postdoc at the german center of applied space technologies and microgravity (ZARM), university of Bremen and the head of the micro satellites and modelling methods group. He received a diploma in aerospace engineering from the technical university of Braunschweig, Germany in 2006 and did part of his undergraduate studies at the university of rhode island, USA. In 2012 he received a PhD in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Bremen, Germany. He was awarded with the "young researcher medal" of the "Werner-von-Siemens-Ring"-Foundation in 2013 and received the Zeldovich Medal in fundamental physics by COSPAR and the russian academy of sciences in 2014. He is one of the PIs of the German CRC 1128: Geo-Q focussing at future spacebound geodesy applications.

Felix Finke is a PhD candidate at the german center of applied space technologies and microgravity (ZARM), university of Bremen and a member of the micro satellites and modelling methods group. He received a masters degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Applied Sciences Aachen, Germany in 2013. He worked as an operations engineer for the Rosetta landing probe Philae from 2013 -2015. He started as a researcher aiming at a PhD in Aerospace Enginnering in 2016 at ZARM, University of Bremen. His work is focussing on the improvement of Solar radiation pressure models for enhanced trajectory predictions.